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Teaching absolute pitch

Williams, P.; Engelmann, S.
Abstract:
This article addresses the issues of trying to teach highly unfamiliar skills and its relation to understanding human growth and development. Williams and Engelmann conducted a study to teach a group of first graders to develop absolute pitch using effective Direct Instruction strategies. The majority of the students could not sing on pitch prior to the study. A control group of high school music students was included in the study. Success was determined by the student’s ability to discriminate notes and produce notes. Results indicated that the experimental students outperformed the control group in overall ability to estimate the notes. The authors concluded that the process of learning absolute pitch follows the same pattern of learning other highly unfamiliar content. Furthermore, the use of reinforcement, models, and basic instructional techniques were shown to be effective in teaching new skills. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).
Research areas:
Year:
1989
Main publication type:
Program Effectiveness
Subtype:
Article
Keywords:
Direct Instruction; music; absolute pitch
Source:
DI News
Volume:
9
Number:
1
Pages:
23-26
Design type:
Posttest only control group design
Fidelity monitored:
No
Students included:
Elementary students, high school students
Location/Setting:
Rural area

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